Color Me Cowtown: It’s Fall, Y’all

As autumn yields to winter, here is a palette of colors—some natural, some not—seen around town:

Trinity River.

Maxwell-Liston house (1904) on May Street.

Clear Fork of the Trinity River at the Southwest Boulevard bridge.

The Supreme Court of the Trinity River is now in session.

Trinity River.

Trinity Park.

Mistletoe Drive.

Pier 1 Building.

West Lancaster bridge.

Trinity River.

Airfield Falls on Farmers Branch creek.

Trinity River.

Lipscomb Avenue in Fairmount.

Botanic Garden.

Bellaire Drive.

House (1918) on Hurley Avenue in Fairmount.

Four classics.

Trinity River.

House (1922) designed by Joseph Pelich on 5th Avenue in Ryan Place.

Fort Worth Central Station (formerly Intermodal Transportation Center) and Bank of America tower.

Botanic Garden.

Panther Island Pavilion at the confluence of the Clear and West forks.

Botanic Garden.

Lobby of the Lone Star Gas building (Hedrick, 1929).

Botanic Garden.

Red River, Texas & Southern railroad bridge (1902) on the West Fork of the Trinity River.

Trinity River.

Oakwood Cemetery.

North Side branch library.

Trinity River.

Paddock Viaduct (1914).

Fort Worth Public Market building (1930).

Farmers market on the Clear Fork of the Trinity River. St. Andrew’s United Methodist Church (1915) on Missouri Avenue.

West Fork of the Trinity River at Rockwood Park.

Red Goose Shoes sign of J. E. Solomon’s Juvenile Shoe Store on Houston Street. The building dates to 1903.

Sinclair gas station restored by Paul Lemon on McCart Avenue.

Greater St. James Baptist Church (1918) on Harding Street.

Sunset in the ’hood.

Lancaster Avenue Bridge (1939) and Phyllis J. Tilley Memorial Bridge (2012) in Trinity Park.

House (1940) on 5th Avenue in Fairmount.

Tree north of downtown.

Porch on Hurley Avenue in Fairmount.

Trinity River.

Tree with matching “dip” sign on West Cantey Street.

Bois d’arc (French for “bow wood”) tree and fruit (also called “horse apple,” “hedge apple,” “Osage orange” etc.) on the Trinity River.

Fairmount Avenue.

Tree at the Fort Worth Police and Firefighters Memorial in Trinity Park.

Don’t wait too long to see our autumn colors. The show doesn’t last long.

For example, here is the Police and Firefighters Memorial tree one week later.

We’ve all had weeks like that.

 

This entry was posted in Architecture, Bricks and Martyr, Casas Grande, Century Club, Cities of the Dead, Class on Glass, Downtown, All Around, Flora, Going to Great Panes, Roadworthy, Rollin' on the River, Sitting Pretty. Bookmark the permalink.

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