Cowtown Yoostabes, Houston Street Edition: From Steaks to Swastikas

The first ten blocks of Houston Street (from the courthouse to the convention center) are a veritable Memory Lane of yoostabes:

building gause101-107 Houston (1910). This building, being located on the southwestern corner of the public square, has had a long and rich life in retail. It yoostabe a meat market, a hotel, a hardware store, a tailor shop, a clothing store.

look up gause verticalNote the letter G in the center of the parapet. Pioneer undertaker George L. Gause built the building.

gause 1912From the 1912 city directory. Joe Daiches Credit Jewelers was a tenant from 1929 to 2010.

building solomon306 Houston (1903). This little building originally housed a furniture store.

sign red goose nightBut for years beginning in the 1930s this building yoostabe Julian Solomon’s Juvenile Shoe Store with its iconic Red Goose Shoe sign.

solomon 36 cdThe Red Goose Saloon now occupies the building.

solomon 46 cdIn the mid-twentieth century downtown was a bazaar: cafes, cigar stands, shoe repair shops, photo studios, train ticket outlets, and drug, jewelry, luggage, shoe, and clothing stores. In 1946 the 300 block of Houston Street had five shoe stores and eight clothing/hat stores.

houston 300 blockPostcard shows, on the right, Bell Shoe Store, Hanover Shoe Store, Juvenile Shoe Store, Fakes, Penney’s. On the left, Stripling and Meacham department stores.

houston-308-316-todayA separate post on the history of the building at 310 Houston Street is here.

1880s city national bank315 Houston (1885). This building, originally City National Bank, and the Jarvis Building (1884) on Main Street are perhaps the oldest commercial buildings in town.

city national 92 cdArchitects Sanguinet and Haggart, who also designed the Land Title Block Building, designed City National Bank Building. The bank folded in 1895. From 1983 until 2010 the building yoostabe Billy Miner’s Saloon. The Loft women’s clothing store occupies the bank building.

building pennys406-408 Houston (1929). This building yoostabe a J. C. Penney store until 1946. Fakes Furniture occupied the building for the next twenty years. The building is now retail and lofts.

building sanger410 Houston (1929). Wyatt C. Hedrick designed this building for Sanger Brothers Department Store, which moved here from its building at 515 Houston.

sanger uso 45 cdAccording to Tarrant County Historic Resources Survey, from 1943 to the end of World War II the Sanger Building served as the biggest USO in the country. In 1945 the 400 block of Houston contained seven clothing/hat stores, two department stores, and yet another shoe store. (In the city directory, “Ft Worth Service Men’s Center” was the USO.)

After the war J. C. Penney moved from 406-408 Houston next door and occupied the building until the 1970s. The building now houses shops, apartments, and Circle Theater.

building woolworth501 Houston (1926). Wiley G. Clarkson designed this building for F. W. Woolworth Department Store, which operated until 1990. Jos. A. Bank Clothier and Milan Gallery are among occupants today.

building meacham515 Houston (1925). Another Clarkson. He designed the building for Sanger’s, which occupied the building for only four years before moving to 410 Houston. From 1947 until 1971 the building housed the department store of Mayor Henry C. Meacham. Today the building houses Ojos Locos sports cantina.

wool meacham 46 cdIn 1946 the east side of the 500 block had three department stores: Woolworth, Monnig, and Meacham.

grants widesign grants611 Houston (1939). The dime stores of William Thomas Grant of Massachusetts operated from 1906 until 1976. The building now houses two bars.

kress grant 46 cdNote that in 1946 the S. H. Kress Building, whose main entrance was on Main Street, also had an entrance on Houston Street. The 600 block contained four clothing stores, two jewelers, two department stores, and two more shoe stores.

building first national with card711 Houston (1910). Sanguinet and Staats designed the original building, which was only fifty feet wide, as the new home of First National Bank. At eleven stories in 1910 it was considered downright vertiginous. In 1926 Wyatt C. Hedrick designed an addition that doubled the building’s facade along Houston Street. In 2003 XTO Energy, headed by Bob Simpson, bought the building. The building was restored and in 2005 renamed the “Bob R. Simpson Building.”

building thompson900 Houston (1910). This building yoostabe a hotel, pharmacy, clothing store, and A&P grocery store.

thompson sign oldAnd, of course, Thompson’s Bookstore occupied the building for several years beginning in 1973.

thompsons sign newA bar by the same name is the current occupant.

thompsons 1919 a&p adIn 1919 you could treat your sweet tooth to a hundred-pound bag of sugar at that A&P for $10.45.

building hogan901 Houston (1900). This old building has been expanded and remodeled several times in its long retail life. Owner John Shelton added a third floor in 1910 and in 1911 leased the building to the S. H. Kress Company. In 1936 Kress built a larger building on Main Street. In 1937 901 Houston housed another dime store: McCrory’s. Later it housed Hogan’s office supply. Today it houses a FedEx Office Print & Ship Center.

thompson and kress 1920 cdThe 1920 city directory lists A&P and Kress.

building houston lofts1910 Houston (1906). Another Sanguinet and Staats, one of the first concrete skyscrapers in Fort Worth with five sides and—to begin with—a dizzying six stories.

This photo shows the building when it had just six stories.

western 1907 cdThe building began its career as the home of William H. Eddleman’s Western National Bank.

swastika-2-floors-1918By 1918 the building housed Texas State Bank, which on April 30, on a front page dominated by news of the war, announced that two stories, designed by Sanguinet and Staats, would be added to the building. The building now houses condos.

building flatiron1000 Houston (1907). Just across 9th Street, Sanguinet and Staats designed the iconic little Flatiron Building for Dr. Bacon Saunders, dean of Fort Worth University’s Fort Worth Medical College. The steel-framed building, one of the tallest in town at the time, was inspired by Manhattan’s Flatiron Building (1902). The Fort Worth building has been renovated by owner Dr. George Cravens.

Pause a New York minute to think about this: Our Flatiron Building is one block from Worth Square, named for city namesake General William Jenkins Worth. The general is buried in Worth Square in Manhattan one block from that Flatiron Building.

The Western National Bank and the Flatiron buildings were built when the swastika was a popular symbol of good luck. Both buildings feature the symbol on their exterior.

houston-901-houston-smith-1940This W. D. Smith photo from Fort Worth in Pictures gives us a 1940 snapshot of the west side of Houston Street. At 906 the bank building was now Mitchell, Gartner & Thompson Insurance Company. On the left edge are the Flatiron Building and the 1939 public library. Looming behind 906 are The Fair (left) and the Waggoner Building. The short building with the black wall is the Thompson’s Bookstore building. Behind the Waggoner Building was the Board of Trade Building (1889).

900 block 46 cdBy 1946 McCrory’s was still at 901, A&P was still across Houston Street in the Thompson’s Bookstore building. The Western National/Texas State Bank Building was occupied by Mitchell, Gartner & Thompson insurance. And look at 909 Houston Street. No yoostabe there. Nosiree. That’s a genuine stillis!

peters 1914 18James and Thomas Peters owned a shoeshine parlor in Waco, moved their business to Fort Worth by 1914, and branched into repairing shoes, cleaning clothes, restoring hats, and, finally, making hats.

building petersface petersHats off to fourteen yoostabes and one stillis.

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4 Responses to Cowtown Yoostabes, Houston Street Edition: From Steaks to Swastikas

  1. Sally Campbell says:

    Seeing the 40’s listing for Lerner’s makes me sad. Glad we still have so much Deco, but we lost the ZING of mid-cent when we lost the swoop of the Lerner’s lattice and the Telstar and aqua glam of the Startlegram auxiliary.

    • hometown says:

      Thanks, Sally. Downtown has changed so much. I wish I could bring Paddock or Peter Smith or even Amon Sr. back for a tour. They would die all over again.

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